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Q215 : Understanding Symbols within Strong's Concordance

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Q215 : Understanding Symbols within Strong's Concordance

Hi,

I have been trying to find out the meaning of 'X' in dictionary entries for Strong's Concordance - what is it for? At times there are some other signs (e.g., '+'). Can you explain the meaning of these signs (as in the examples below)?

3956 pas

including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole:—all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.

5426 phroneo

from 5424; to exercise the mind, i.e. entertain or have a sentiment or opinion; by implication, to be (mentally) disposed (more or less earnestly in a certain direction); intensively, to interest oneself in (with concern or obedience):—set the affection on, (be) care(-ful), (be like-, + be of one, + be of the same, + let this) mind(-ed), regard, savour, think.

I tried Google but came out with not much help. Would appreciate your explanation.

Thanks!

A215 : by Tony Garland

For an explanation of some of the signs used within Strong's Concordance, see the "signs employed" page near the beginning of the respective online dictionaries below.

Even so, the descriptions can be a bit puzzling. So let’s consider the two dictionary entries you asked about:

3956 pas

including all the forms of declension; apparently a primary word; all, any, every, the whole:—all (manner of, means), alway(-s), any (one), X daily, + ever, every (one, way), as many as, + no(-thing), X thoroughly, whatsoever, whole, whosoever.

at times there are some other 'sign's eg + or perhaps there might be this ~ (can't recall now)

5426 phroneo

from 5424; to exercise the mind, i.e. entertain or have a sentiment or opinion; by implication, to be (mentally) disposed (more or less earnestly in a certain direction); intensively, to interest oneself in (with concern or obedience):—set the affection on, (be) care(-ful), (be like-, + be of one, + be of the same, + let this) mind(-ed), regard, savour, think.

In Strong's entries, “X” denotes “multiplication” and “+” (plus) denotes addition to form a phrase.

Multiplication

  • X (multiplication): denotes a rendering in the [text] that results from an idiom peculiar to the original language
"X" is used to describe situations where the word in question appears with another word or in a repeated phrase which multiples the original meaning of the associated word. For example, in Acts 5:42, the word for all/every (pas, Strong's G3956) appears with the word for "day" (hemera) resulting in the idea of "every day" or "each day" which results in the English translation "daily." Hence, the Strong's entry "X daily" means that when pas is combined with the word for "day" it multiplies the idea of "day" to denote "daily" (over and over, day by day).

Another example which illustrates an "idiom peculiar to the original language" can be found at 2 Corinthians 11:6:

But though I be rude in speech, yet not in knowledge; but we have been thoroughly [en pas] made manifest among you in [en] all things [pas]1

In this verse, the Greek phrase "en pas" (in all, in everything) appears twice. The first occurrence carries the idea of "thoroughly" whereas the second occurrence is rendered more literally by "in all things." The translators understand this repeated construction as conveying intensification ("thoroughly") in its first appearance in the phrase. This form of "multiplication" is much more subtle and requires a more advanced knowledge of Greek to translate accurately. A less knowledgeable translator might have rendered the verse as “. . . but we have been in all things made manifest among you in all things.”

Addition

  • + (addition): denotes a rendering in the [text] of one or more Greek words in connection with the one under consideration.
The plus symbol is used to describe ways in which the original language word is combined with one or more additional original language words to form a related, but different concept or thought.

For example, the Strong's entry for pas (G3956) includes “no(-thing)" which means that when pas (all/every) is combined with the Greek word for "no" the resulting idea conveyed may by "nothing" (the negation of "all" or "everything").

The Strong's entry for phroneo (G5426) includes "(be like-, + be of one, + be of the same, + let this) mind(-ed)". What this is saying is that when the word phroneo appears with the Greek words for "be like," "be of one," "be of the same," or "let this," the resulting idea being conveyed by the combined phrase is "be like minded," be of one mind", "be of the same mind," or "let this mind." So the basic meaning of phroneo is "to exercise the mind" but when combined with other Greek words the meaning is altered in subtle ways. When reading the Strong's definition, imagine inserting the key word ahead of each occurrence of "+" as in: "[phroneo] + be of one" = "be of one mind."

Hope that helps as you continue to study God’s Word.


Endnotes:

1.Ref-0308, 2Cor. 11:6


Sources:

Ref-0308The Holy Bible : King James Version. 1995. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.


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