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5.2.32 - Hippolytus

Hippolytus (c. 170 - c. 236 A.D.) was the first ‘antipope’ (schismatic bishop of Rome). . . When Callistus became bishop in 217, Hippolytus left the church and (probably) was elected bishop of Rome by his influential supporters. This schism persisted until 235, when Roman authorities found both pope (now Pontian) and antipope (Hippolytus) guilty of preaching the gospel. They were sent to the extermination mines of Sardinia. This led each of them to abdicate his episcopate and reestablish fellowship. Both became martyrs on ‘death island.’ . . . Hippolytus was the most significant theologian in Rome during the third century, producing books, commentaries, and topical treatises.”1 “This Hippolytus, a famed church father, was a disciple of Irenaeus, who was in turn a follower of Polycarp, the personal disciple of John the Apostle.”2

Notes

1 James D. Smith, “The Gallery—Wordsmiths of Worship,” in Christian History: Worship in the Early Church, vol. 37 (Carrol Stream, IL: Christianity Today, 1993), s.v. “Hippolytus of Rome.”

2 James O. Combs, Mysteries of the Book of Daniel (Springfield, IL: Tribune Publishers, 1994), 133.


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